SURLY

Surly Moonlander

Moonlander runs 4.8˝ tires on 100mm rims. Such a large footprint allows you to ride them at very low pressure, which (as with a snowshoe) enables unparalleled traction and float over all kinds of terrain…wet stuff, roots, rocks, pebbles, gravel, sand, and many types of snow. Moonlander, like its name implies, is meant to go beyond where normal bikes, even normal fat bikes, can go. It is designed from the ground up to ride where there are no roads, no trails and no people.

Surly Ice Cream Truck

The Ice Cream Truck has the ability to float over pretty much anything you’ll find out there be it snow, rocks, mud, sand, or rocky mud. But unlike our other, more terrain crawling fat bike models, the Ice Cream Truck’s geometry is trail approved and ready to rip.

The Ice Cream Truck is made out of our own proprietary 4130 CroMoly steel and is ED coated. ED coating is a process that leaves a coating that externally provides a solid foundation for paint while also providing an added layer of corrosion protection internally, however, we still recommend an additional treatment such as Frame Saver or Boeshield. Ice Cream Truck begins to differ from all of our other fat bike models from there.

Surly Ice Cream Truck Ops

Ice Cream Truck Ops is a ‘little brother’ of sorts to the Ice Cream Truck but both share the same Surly 4130 triple butted Cro-Moly Ice Cream Truck frame, which can only mean that you’ve come here looking for a trail-approved ripper that can fit some big ass tires. The Ice Cream Truck Ops uses the same 190mm spaced rear end of the standard Ice Cream Truck. With the Surly MDS dropout system you have the option of running a 197x12 thru-axle, 190mm geared or single speed drive train. The complete Ice Cream Truck Ops comes with only the Shimano direct mount, 197mm thru-axle chips and framesets come with all three MDS chips so you can build the frame up however you want.

Pugsley Ops

We won’t beat you over the head re-explaining the idea of the Pugsley or fat bike theory. If you’re looking at this bike there’s a good chance you already know what you’re looking at, and if you don’t then check out the Pugsley and Moonlander pages. There’s plenty of info there to get you up to speed. Pug Ops shares the same frame as the standard Pugsley, and it has the same non-offset fork. The fork has clearance for 4.8˝ tires on 100mm rims, it’s spaced for 135mm hubs and has cage-mounting bosses on each leg for running either standard bottle cages in a high or low position or a larger gear cage.

Pugsley 10speed

Many moons ago we began producing the Pugsley because we wanted to ride a bike that could be ridden where other bikes simply faltered. In order to do that we figured this bicycle needed to have floatation and traction the likes of which have never before been seen. Pugsley is our brilliant solution to this -and it seems to work. This bike rolls through all the sloppiest slop around.

The Pugsley frame is equipped with 135mm spaced horizontal rear-loading dropouts with a derailleur hanger. The rear end of the frame is offset 17.5mm so any type of drivetrain setup can be used without having to worry about chain-on-tire rub.

Surly Straggler

So what is this Straggler anyway? The easy answer is to say that we added disc brakes to a Cross-Check and this is close to accurate. People have asked us to make a disc version of our highly versatile Cross-Check for a long time now and almost everything about the two are very similar. Straggler is slightly different, though.

The most obvious difference of course is that the Straggler has disc caliper mounts instead of rim brake studs. It’ll accept rotors up to 160mm. The rear dropouts are unique, too. They’re a partially closed horizontal design that accommodates singlespeed or geared drivetrains.

Surly Cross Check

The Cross-Check was the third frame we ever offered. There is no such thing as one bike that can do it all, but the Cross-Check does a good job of most things people use bikes for. It’s a cyclocross bike by design but that’s not how most people use it. It does as good a job getting you across the country as it does getting you across town. It’s at home on the road and on trails, on gravel, and just about whatever else you might run into. It’ll take pretty big tires, or smaller ones if you like. It can be built as a geared bike, a singlespeed or a fixed-gear.

Surly Pacer

The Pacer sits in an interesting category of bicycle. These days, most road bikes are made of some material other than steel. The current zeitgeist of road bicycles and road bicycling generally tends to overlook things that are not screaming for attention like a spoiled child, and the Pacer is a bit of a loner.  Pacer likes to put in the big miles and hang out in the country, way out in the country. Pacer cares not about the weather. It remains indifferent mile after mile, you just provide the propulsion and Pacer will handle the rest.

Surly Steamroller

The Steamroller is a fixed gear made for streets. Its geometry is closer to that of a road bike than a true track bike, and its double-butted 4130 cro-moly steel tubing and geometry make for a lively and resilient ride. The Steamroller is adept at handling rough, pot-holed streets, grass shortcuts, urban trails, back alleys and whathaveyou.

We sell it as a frame and fork. Use a track crank or a road crank. It’s got room for tires up to about 38mm because big tires roll fast and absorb all kinds of road static, from pea gravel to cracks to cobble stones. We gave it a standard 1-1/8˝ threadless straight steer tube, one set of water bottle cage bosses, and rear-loading horizontal dropouts. The bottom bracket shell is standard English-threaded. Although it is designed as a fixed-gear, we gave it accommodations for rim brakes front and rear should you decide a freewheeling singlespeed is more your style.

Surly Long Haul Trucker

Over the years our Long Haul Trucker has developed a devoted following. People understand and appreciate the LHT’s dependability and everyday riding comfort, whether they’re cruising to the store or lost in the middle of nowhere. It was designed in all aspects to go the distance in relative comfort while hauling a bunch of stuff.

The LHT is in most ways a typical touring bike. It has a low bottom bracket and long chainstays provide comfort and stability. It’s got all the braze-ons, from rack mounts to water bottle cage bosses to fender mounts to a spare spoke holder. Like all our frames, it’s made of CroMoly steel. You’ll probably never need to have the frame repaired, but if you do you’re more likely to find someone who can weld steel than someone who can weld titanium or aluminum. Repair carbon fiber in the middle of Mongolia? Good luck with that.

Surly Disc Trucker

Our Long Haul Trucker enjoys a reputation as one of the best riding and most value-packed touring bikes out there. It’s been around long enough to be tested in the real world, in all kinds of places, with all kinds of loads on all kinds of roads.

Sometimes, however, a combination of load, climate and terrain demands a bit more braking performance than a standard rim-brake LHT can provide. That’s where the Disc Trucker comes in. Disc Trucker is a Long Haul Trucker specifically designed for the unique forces discs impose. We’ve made sure it can run discs, racks, and fenders with no jury rigging, a somewhat unique feature we’ve just now decided to call Simulpatibility.

Surly Orge

This is Ogre, Troll’s big wheeled brother sister. Troll and Ogre offer the same ability to accommodate a wide array of drivetrains, brakes, and cargo-hauling accessories. The main difference is that Ogre runs on 29˝ wheels, the Troll on 26˝.

Built of 4130 CroMoly steel and based on the tried-and-true geometry of our venerable Karate Monkey, Ogre is designed to be a platform for exploration, commuting, trailer-pulling, on-road and off-road touring, and just riding along. Ogre features, mounts for linear-pull and disc brakes, three bottle cage mounts (the mounts on the top of the downtube allow higher or lower cage placement depending on your needs), ample room between the stays for high-volume rubber up to 2.5˝, and housing guides designed to accommodate three lines which cleanly organize full shift and brake housing.

Surly Troll

Though the Troll’s geometry is that of a 26˝-wheeled mountain bike, it’s unlike most mountain bikes you’ll find on your local bike shop floor. The frame has ample clearance for 28/38/50t mountain-triple chainrings and room for 26 x 2.75˝ tires. The gusseted front triangle, with its sloping toptube, provides generous standover clearance even when running high-volume rubber.

Build it with a 100mm travel suspension fork, or roll the 4130 CroMoly Troll fork. The stock fork is spec’d with canti pivots, disc mounts, low- and mid-blade rack bosses and fender eyelets. Run a rack, fender and disc at the same time, no jury-rigging required.

Surly Instigator

Some may remember a Surly model we discontinued called the Instigator. The Instigator was a burly hardtail made for going fast and going big. Our new Instigator picks up where that one left off. This thing is beefy and tough, yet quick-handling and well balanced. This new Instigator differs from the old one of course. Most notably, Instigator 2.0 is what we call 26+, designed to run 26˝ (559mm ETRTO) Rabbit Hole rims. At 50mm they’re quite a bit wider than standard MTB rims, and coupled with our 2.75˝ Dirt Wizard tires the overall diameter is about 27.5˝ (roughly 650b). All this means you get loads of traction and cushion yet you can still accelerate like mad. The toptube is long and the wheelbase relatively short, with a nice front/rear balance. This thing is made from the ground up to swoop, rail, hammer, drift, carve and fly. It goes downhill like nobody’s business and climbs well too.

Surly ECR

Attention bike camp/exploration nerds! Are you sitting down? Behold ECR. ECR is a sure-footed, multi-terrain, offroad-obsessed 29+ camp bike. It’s something of a lovechild borne of our Krampus, Ogre and Long Haul Trucker.

Like the Ogre, ECR can run racks, fenders and disc brakes simultaneously, front and rear. It’s compatible with singlespeed, full derailleur and IGH drivetrains (it even features a dedicated Rohloff torque arm mount) because the rear dropouts are just like those on our Ogre and Troll frames. Run what you like. ECR has multiple mounts on the frame and fork for water bottle cages and larger gear cages, so you can bring lots of water, stove fuel, milk, a sleeping pad, small mammals or what have you.

Surly Krampus

Krampus is the evolution of the 29er. It’s not a fat bike. True, its got 3” tires on 50mm rims (we call this combination “29+”). But where fat bikes are really designed for slow-speed crawling, Krampus’s frame (geometry, tubing diameter/thickness) has been designed with a long toptube and as short a rear end as we could get away with given the wheel/tire size. This, when combined with the big, wide tires, results in a mad amount of rolling inertia and grip. It rips and responds well to body English. The big tires also offer a bit of suspension-like cushion. Krampus is a trail bike that also tackles all kinds of terrain. Krampus lives somewhere between bushwhacking, speed racing, and back lot dirt track riding, and all this makes it just plain fun to ride.

Surly Karate Monkey

The Karate Monkey was one of the first production 29ers. It put the 29˝ platform in front of a lot of people at a price within reach of many a bike nerd. Since then 29-inch has become a full-blown category, with entire bike companies dedicated to the platform. 29˝ wheels offer some benefits over the old standard 26˝ wheels. They deliver increased traction, smooth out terrain, carry inertia and generally fit tall riders better than 26˝. The Karate Monkey helped set the standard for 29er geometry. Its rear wheel is tucked in, keeping it nimble and maneuverable. The bottom bracket height maintains ground clearance while remaining low enough to ensure stability. The toptube slopes, keeping the headtube up for good fit and to allow the use of an 80mm suspension fork, while supplying good standover clearance for your little friend.